Some Points to Remember

  • People with haemophilia bleed no faster than normal.

  • You may suspect your child has a bleed but you are not sure. If in doubt assume it is a bleed and treat it as such.

  • All bumps or knocks to the head should be treated seriously. You should bring your child to your treatment centre immediately – do not wait for symptoms to appear.

  • Do remember that any medication containing Aspirin should not be given to anyone with a bleeding disorder as this can cause bleeding. Always check with your doctor which medicine is safe.

  • Avoid injections into muscles. A muscle injection could cause painful bleeding. However, vaccinations are important and safe for a person with haemophilia. If in doubt contact your haemophilia treatment centre for advice.

  • When planning your family holiday remember to make contact with your haemophilia centre to arrange to get sufficient factor concentrate for the duration of your stay. If you are travelling outside the country you will need, for customs purposes, to carry a letter from your child’s haematologist concerning the product you are carrying. It is also wise to find out before you travel the location and contact details of the nearest haemophilia treatment centre to where you will be staying.

  • Identification cards which contain details of the type and severity of your child’s bleeding disorder are available from the Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital, Crumlin and it is advisable for your child to have this or one of the recognised medical alert symbols with him at all times when he is not accompanied by an adult.

  • If a babysitter is caring for your child, tell them about his bleeding disorder and make sure that they know who to contact and what to do in an emergency.

  • Likewise when your child starts playschool make sure his carers are aware of his condition.

  • And remember your child is a normal child who just happens to have a bleeding disorder. Do not let him or his condition take over the family.
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